NOT THE SHARPEST KNIFE IN THE DRAWER: AZ Representative’s Anti-Boobs Remarks

 

The Stiletto's readers know of her crusade against boobism – the last acceptable form of anti-woman bias (“Boobs And Brains Not Mutually Exclusive,” The Daily Blade, December 27, 2006). Well, here’s another example of this ignorant, ugly stereotype.

 

On a 31-19 roll call vote, the AZ state House on Thursday rejected a Dem amendment to a bill proposing to change the height requirement for rear fender mudflaps on trucks that would have banned those with images that are "obscene or hateful," such as silhouettes of voluptuous naked women.

 

A supporter of the amendment, Yuma’s Rep. Theresa Ulmer, tells The Associated Press:

"I personally am tired of explaining to my 11-year-old son why they (women) are depicted on mudflaps , but not all women are 36Ds. He's very confused by that," Ulmer said. "But seriously, this is about family values - what are we going to send out as a message to our children."

 

Apparently, the message that Ulmer has been sending to her son is that women who can fill a D cup are sluts who have no family values.

 

At his age, the women Ulmer’s son is most likely to interact with on a daily basis are staffers at his school and his friends’ mothers - some of whom will be curvaceous women who are stay-at-home mothers, or who work as doctors, nurses, lawyers, librarians, school crossing guards, store clerks, etc. Not a stripper, porn actress or hooker among them, in all probability.

 

It stands to reason that the boy is confused by his mother’s hate-filled boobism. His lyin’ eyes inform him that a woman's physical appearance does not correlate with her IQ, or with the content of her character.

 

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